seminar

Design of Robotics and Embedded systems, Analysis, and Modeling Seminar (DREAMS)

Fall 2016

The Design of Robotics and Embedded systems, Analysis, and Modeling Seminar (DREAMS) occurs weekly on Mondays from 4.10-5.00 p.m. in 250 Sutardja Dai Hall.

Similar to last year, DREAMS has joined forces with the Control Theory Seminar and the CITRIS People and Robots Seminar CPAR.

The Design of Robotics and Embedded systems, Analysis, and Modeling Seminar topics are announced to the DREAMS list, which includes the chessworkshop workgroup, which includes the chesslocal workgroup.

Information on the seminar series might be useful for potential speakers. If you have any questions about DREAMS, please contact Dorsa Sadigh. If you want to subscribe to our mailing list, please drop me a line.

Seminars from previous semesters can be found here.

Schedule

Alessandro Abate August 22, 2016
Mykel Kochenderfer August 29, 2016 UPCOMING
Mark Mueller September 12, 2016 UPCOMING
Joao Hespanha September 19, 2016 UPCOMING
Meeko Oishi September 26, 2016 UPCOMING
Radha Poovendran October 03, 2016 UPCOMING
Aws Albarghouthi October 10, 2016 UPCOMING
Tom Griffiths October 17, 2016 UPCOMING
Nancy Amato October 24, 2016 UPCOMING
Sergey Levine October 31, 2016 UPCOMING
Ian Mitchell November 07, 2016 UPCOMING
Marco Pavone November 14, 2016 UPCOMING
Hamsa Balakrishnan November 21, 2016 UPCOMING
Karl Johansson November 28, 2016 UPCOMING
Yon Visell December 05, 2016 UPCOMING

Data-driven and model-based quantitative verification and correct-by-design synthesis of CPS

Aug 22, 2016, 4-5pm, 250 SDH, Alessandro Abate, University of Oxford.

Slides

Abstract

I discuss a new and formal, measurement-driven and model-based automated verification and synthesis technique, to be applied on quantitative properties over systems with partly unknown dynamics. I focus on physical systems (with spatially continuous variables, possibly noisy), driven by external inputs and accessed under noisy measurements, and suggest that the approach can be as well generalised over CPS. I formulate this new setup as a data-driven Bayesian model inference problem, formally embedded within a quantitative, model-based verification procedure.

While emphasising the generality of the approach over a number of diverse model classes, this talk zooms in on systems represented via stochastic hybrid models (SHS), which are probabilistic models with heterogeneous dynamics (continuous/discrete, i.e. hybrid, as well as nonlinear) - as such, SHS are quite a natural framework for CPS. With focus on model-based verification procedures, I provide the characterisation of general temporal specifications based on Bellman’s dynamic programming. The computation of such properties and the synthesis of related control architectures optimising properties of interest, is attained via the development of abstraction techniques based on quantitative approximations. Theory is complemented by algorithms, all packaged in a software tool (FAUST^2) that is freely available to users.

Bio:

Alessandro Abate is an Associate Professor in the Department of Computer Science at the University of Oxford, and a Fellow of the Alan Turing Institute in London (UK). He received a Laurea in Electrical Engineering in October 2002 from the University of Padova (IT), an MS in May 2004 and a PhD in December 2007, both in Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences, at UC Berkeley (USA). He has been an International Fellow in the CS Lab at SRI International in Menlo Park (USA), and a PostDoctoral Researcher at Stanford University (USA), in the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics. From June 2009 to mid 2013 he has been an Assistant Professor at the Delft Center for Systems and Control, TU Delft (NL).

His research interests are in the formal verification and control of complex (probabilistic and hybrid) models, in the integration of data-based learning aspects within these deductive techniques, and in the application of complex models over a number of domains, particularly in energy and in systems biology.


Building Trust in Decision Support Systems for Aerospace

Aug 29, 2016, 4-5pm, 250 SDH, Mykel Kochenderfer, Stanford University.

Slides

Abstract

Starting in the 1970s, decades of effort went into building human-designed rules for providing automatic maneuver guidance to pilots to avoid mid-air collisions. The resulting system was later mandated worldwide on all large aircraft and significantly improved the safety of the airspace. Recent work has investigated the feasibility of using partially observable Markov decision processes (POMDPs) and advanced computational techniques to derive optimized decision logic that better handles various sources of uncertainty and balances competing system objectives. This approach has resulted in a system called Airborne Collision Avoidance System (ACAS) X that significantly reduces the risk of mid-air collision while also reducing the alert rate, and it is in the process of becoming the next international standard. Using ACAS X as a case study, this talk will discuss lessons learned about building trust in advanced decision support systems. This talk will also outline research challenges in facilitating greater levels of automation and integrating unmanned aircraft into the airspace.

Bio:

Mykel Kochenderfer is Assistant Professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics at Stanford University. Prior to joining the faculty, he was at MIT Lincoln Laboratory where he worked on airspace modeling and aircraft collision avoidance, with his early work leading to the establishment of the ACAS X program. He received a Ph.D. from the University of Edinburgh and B.S. and M.S. degrees in computer science from Stanford University. Prof. Kochenderfer is the director of the Stanford Intelligent Systems Laboratory (SISL), conducting research on advanced algorithms and analytical methods for the design of robust decision making systems. He is the author of "Decision Making under Uncertainty: Theory and Application" from MIT Press. He is a third generation pilot.


Sep 12, 2016, 4-5pm, 250 SDH, Mark Mueller, University of California, Berkeley.

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Abstract

Bio:


Sep 19, 2016, 4-5pm, 250 SDH, Joao Hespanha, University of California, Santa Barbara.

Slides

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Bio:


Sep 26, 2016, 4-5pm, 250 SDH, Meeko Oishi, University of New Mexico.

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Oct 03, 2016, 4-5pm, 250 SDH, Radha Poovendran, University of Washington.

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Bio:


Proving that Programs do not Discriminate

Oct 10, 2016, 4-5pm, 250 SDH, Aws Albarghouthi, University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Slides

Abstract

Programs have become powerful arbitrators of a range of significant decisions with far-reaching societal impact -- hiring, welfare allocation, prison sentencing, policing, amongst an ever-growing list. In such scenarios, the program is carrying out a sensitive task, and could potentially be illegally discriminating —- advertently or inadvertently —- against a protected group, e.g., African Americans in the United States.

With the range and sensitivity of algorithmic decisions expanding by the day, the question of whether an algorithm is fair (unbiased) has captured the attention of a broad spectrum of experts, from government regulators and law scholars to computer science theorists. Ultimately, algorithmic fairness is a question about programs and their properties: Does a program discriminate against a subset of the population? In this talk, I will view algorithmic fairness through the lens of program verification. Specifically, I will begin by formalizing the notion of fairness as a probabilistic property of programs. To enable automated verification of fairness, I will show how to reduce the probabilistic verification question to that of volume computation over first-order formulas, and describe a new symbolic volume computation algorithm. Finally, I will present results of applying FairSquare -- the first fairness verification tool -- to a variety of decision-making programs.

Bio:

Aws Albarghouthi is an Assistant Professor of Computer Science at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He works on software verification, analysis, and synthesis.


Oct 17, 2016, 4-5pm, 250 SDH, Tom Griffiths, University of California, Berkeley.

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Oct 24, 2016, 4-5pm, 250 SDH, Nancy Amato, Texas A&M University.

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Oct 31, 2016, 4-5pm, 250 SDH, Sergey Levine, University of California, Berkeley.

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Nov 07, 2016, 4-5pm, 250 SDH, Ian Mitchell, University of British Columbia.

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Nov 14, 2016, 4-5pm, 250 SDH, Marco Pavone, Stanford University.

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Nov 21, 2016, 4-5pm, 250 SDH, Hamsa Balakrishnan, Massachusettes Institute of Technology.

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Nov 28, 2016, 3-4pm, 250 SDH, Karl Johansson, KTH Royal Institute of Technology.

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Dec 05, 2016, 4-5pm, 250 SDH, Yon Visell, University of California, Santa Barbara.

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Bio:


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