seminar

Design of Robotics and Embedded systems, Analysis, and Modeling Seminar (DREAMS)

Spring 2016

The Design of Robotics and Embedded systems, Analysis, and Modeling Seminar (DREAMS) occurs weekly on Mondays from 4.10-5.00 p.m. in 250 Sutardja Dai Hall.

The DREAMS topics are announced to the DREAMS mailing list, which includes the chessworkshop workgroup, and the chesslocal workgroup.

In Spring 2016, DREAMS joined forces with the Control Theory Seminar and the CITRIS People and Robots Seminar (CPAR).

Information on the seminar series might be useful for potential speakers. If you have any questions about DREAMS, please contact Dorsa Sadigh. If you want to subscribe to our mailing list, please drop me a line.

Seminars from previous semesters can be found here.

Schedule

Ashish Tiwari January 11, 2016
Antonio Bicchi January 25, 2016
Stefano Ermon January 25, 2016
Matthew Mason February 01, 2016
Lotfi Zadeh February 08, 2016 UPCOMING
Werner Damm February 22, 2016 UPCOMING
Paul Bogdan February 29, 2016 UPCOMING
Oussama Khatib March 08, 2016 UPCOMING
Jonathan Sprinkle March 14, 2016 UPCOMING
Stefano Carpin March 28, 2016 UPCOMING
Gregory Hager April 04, 2016 UPCOMING
Parimal Kopardekar April 11, 2016 UPCOMING
Yiannis Aloimonos April 18, 2016 UPCOMING
Mireille Broucke April 25, 2016 UPCOMING
Radha Poovendran May 02, 2016 UPCOMING
Ian Mitchell May 09, 2016 UPCOMING
Joao Hespanha May 16, 2016 UPCOMING

Verifying Hybrid Systems

Jan 11, 2016, 4-5pm, 250 SDH, Ashish Tiwari, SRI International.

Slides

Abstract

Most of the existing approaches for verification of hybrid systems are lifted versions of verification approaches that have worked well for discrete systems.

In this talk, we shall explore a few new verification techniques that are designed specifically for verifying hybrid systems. Specifically, we present abstraction techniques that abstract the dynamics, and not the state space, of the system. We also consider the option of abstracting the initial states and property, but not the state space and dynamics of the system. We will conclude by briefly discussing the larger landscape of techniques that are currently used for verifying hybrid systems.

Bio:

Ashish Tiwari is a Senior Computer Scientist in the formal methods group of the Computer Science Laboratory at SRI International. He received his B.Tech and Ph.D. degrees in Computer Science from the Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur and the State University of New York at Stony Brook in 1995 and 2000, respectively. His research interests lie in the areas of static program analysis, formal methods, automated deduction, automated synthesis, and symbolic computation. He is especially interested in using symbolic techniques and machine learning techniques in analyzing models of cyber-physical systems and models coming from various other domains, including systems biology.


Body Languages for physical Human-Robot Interaction

Jan 25, 2016, 3-4pm, 250 SDH, Antonio Bicchi, University of Pisa.

Slides

Abstract

Modern approaches to the design of robots with increasing amounts of embodied intelligence affect human-robot interaction paradigms. The physical structure of robots is evolving from traditional rigid, heavy industrial machines into soft bodies exhibiting new levels of versatility, adaptability, safety, elasticity, dynamism and energy efficiency. New challenges and opportunities arise for the control of soft robots: for instance, carefully planning for collision avoidance may no longer be a dominating concern, being on the contrary physical interaction with the environment not only allowed, but even desirable to solve complex tasks. To address these challenges, it is often useful to look at how humans use their own bodies in similar tasks, and even in some cases have a direct dialogue between the natural and artificial counterparts.

Bio:

Antonio Bicchi is Professor of Robotics at the University of Pisa, and Senior Scientist at the Italian Institute of Technology in Genoa. He graduated from the University of Bologna in 1988 and was a postdoc scholar at M.I.T. Artificial Intelligence lab in 1988–1990. He teaches Control Systems and Robotics in the Department of Information Engineering (DII) of the University of Pisa, leads the Robotics group at the Research Center "E. Piaggio'' of the University of Pisa since 1990, where he was Director from 2003 to 2012. He is an Adjunct Professor at the School of Biological and Health Systems Engineering of Arizona State University since 2013.

His main research interests are in Robotics, Haptics, and Control Systems in general. He has published more than 400 papers on international journals, books, and refereed conferences. He is Editor-in-Chief of the IEEE Robotics and Automation Letters, which he started in 2015. He is Program Chair of the IEEE Int.. Conf. Robotics and Automation (ICRA'16), has co-organized and chaired the first WorldHaptics Conference (2005), and Hybrid Systems: Computation and Control (2007). He served as the President of the Italian Association or Researchers in Automatic Control (2012-2013), as Editor in Chief of the Conference Editorial Board for the IEEE Robotics and Automation Society (RAS), as Vice President for Publications (2013-2014), for Membership (2006-2007), and as Distinguished Lecturer (2004-2006) of IEEE RAS. He is the recipient of several awards and honors. In 2012, he was awarded with an individual Advanced Grant from the European Research Council for his research on human and robot hands. Antonio Bicchi is a Fellow of IEEE since 2005.


Probabilistic Inference by Hashing and Optimization

Jan 25, 2016, 4-5pm, 250 SDH, Stefano Ermon, Stanford University.

Slides

Abstract

Statistical inference in high-dimensional probabilistic models (i.e., with many variables) is one of the central problems of statistical machine learning and stochastic decision making. To date, only a handful of distinct methods have been developed, most notably (MCMC) sampling, decomposition, and variational methods. In this talk, I will introduce a fundamentally new approach based on random projections and combinatorial optimization. Our approach provides provable guarantees on accuracy, and outperforms traditional methods in a range of domains, in particular those involving combinations of probabilistic and causal dependencies (such as those coming from physical laws) among the variables. This allows for a tighter integration between inductive and deductive reasoning, and offers a range of new modeling opportunities.

Bio:

Stefano Ermon is currently an Assistant Professor in the Department of Computer Science at Stanford University, where he is affiliated with the Artificial Intelligence Laboratory. He completed his PhD in computer science at Cornell in 2015. His research interests include techniques for scalable and accurate inference in graphical models, statistical modeling of data, large-scale combinatorial optimization, and robust decision making under uncertainty, and is motivated by a range of applications, in particular ones in the emerging field of computational sustainability. Stefano has won several awards, including two Best Student Paper Awards, one Runner-Up Prize, and a McMullen Fellowship.


Haptic perception, grasping and manipulation with simple robotic grippers

Feb 01, 2016, 4-5pm, 250 SDH, Matthew Mason, Carnegie Mellon University.

Slides

Abstract

For about fifty years robotics researchers have been designing and testing robot grippers and hands. The designs vary dramatically in complexity, from a simple pair of tongs to hands with complexity approaching the human hand in some respects. The "Simple Hands" project at Carnegie Mellon seeks to demonstrate advanced manipulation capabilities with very simple hands, for example a gripper with a single motor and just a few sensors. With this system we have demonstrated grasping of objects, haptic recognition, pose estimation, change of grasp pose, and placing. Our approach uses physics models based on Newtonian mechanics and Coulomb friction, combined with machine learning techniques.

Bio:

Matthew T. Mason earned the BS, MS, and PhD degrees in Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence at MIT, finishing his PhD in 1982. Since that time he has been on the faculty at Carnegie Mellon University. He was Director of the Robotics Institute from 2004 to 2014, and is presently Professor of Robotics and Computer Science. His prior work includes force control, automated assembly planning, mechanics of pushing and grasping, automated parts orienting and feeding, and mobile robotics. He is co-author of "Robot Hands and the Mechanics of Manipulation" (MIT Press 1985), co-editor of "Robot Motion: Planning and Control" (MIT Press 1982), and author of "Mechanics of Robotic Manipulation" (MIT Press 2001). He is a Fellow of the AAAI, and a Fellow of the IEEE. He is a winner of the System Development Foundation Prize and the IEEE Robotics and Automation Society's Pioneer Award.


Stratification, target set reachability and incremental enlargement principle

Feb 08, 2016, 4-5pm, 250 SDH, Lotfi A. Zadeh, University of California, Berkeley.

Slides

Abstract

This paper presents a brief exposition of a version the concept of stratification, call it CST for short. In our approach to stratification, CST is a computational system in which the objects of computation are strata of data. Usually, the strata are nested or stacked with nested strata centering on a target set, T. CST has a potential for significant applications in planning, robotics, optimal control, pursuit, multiobjective optimization, exploration, search and other fields. Very simple, familiar examples of stratification are dictionaries, directories and catalogues. A multi-layer perceptron may be viewed as a system with a stratified structure. In spirit, CST has similarity to dynamic programing (DP), but it is much easier to understand and much easier to implement. An interesting question which relates to neuroscience is: Does the human brain employ stratification to store information? It would be natural to represent a concept such as chair, as a collection of strata with one or more strata representing a type of chair.

Underlining our approach is a model, call it FSM. FSM is a discrete-time, discrete-state dynamical system which has a finite number of states. The importance of FSM as a model derives from the fact that through the use of granulation and/or quantization almost any kind of system can be approximated to by a finite state system. A concept which plays an important role in our approach is that of target set reachability. Reachability involves moving (transitioning) FSM from a state w to a state in target state, T, in a minimum number of steps. To this end, the state space, W, is stratified through the use of what is refer as the incremental enlargement principle. It should also be noted that the concept reachability is related to the concept of accessibility in modal logic.

Bio:

LOTFI A. ZADEH is a Professor in the Graduate School, Computer Science Division, Department of EECS, University of California, Berkeley. In addition, he is serving as the Director of BISC (Berkeley Initiative in Soft Computing).

Lotfi Zadeh is an alumnus of the University of Tehran, MIT and Columbia University. From 1950 to 1959, Lotfi Zadeh was a member of the Department of Electrical Engineering, Columbia University. He joined the Department of Electrical Engineering at UC Berkeley in 1959 and served as its Chair from 1963 to 1968. During his tenure as Chair, he played a key role in changing the name of the Department from EE to EECS.

Lotfi Zadeh held visiting appointments at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, NJ; MIT, Cambridge, MA; IBM Research Laboratory, San Jose, CA; AI Center, SRI International, Menlo Park, CA; and the Center for the Study of Language and Information, Stanford University.

Lotfi Zadeh is a Fellow of the IEEE, AAAS, ACM, AAAI, and IFSA. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and a Foreign Member of the Finnish Academy of Sciences, the Polish Academy of Sciences, Korean Academy of Science & Technology, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, the International Academy of Systems Studies, Moscow, and the Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences. He is a recipient of the IEEE Education Medal, the IEEE Richard W. Hamming Medal, the IEEE Medal of Honor, the ASME Rufus Oldenburger Medal, the B. Bolzano Medal of the Czech Academy of Sciences, the Kampe de Feriet Medal, the AACC Richard E. Bellman Control Heritage Award, the Grigore Moisil Prize, the Honda Prize, the Okawa Prize, the AIM Information Science Award, the IEEE-SMC J. P. Wohl Career Achievement Award, the SOFT Scientific Contribution Memorial Award of the Japan Society for Fuzzy Theory, the IEEE Millennium Medal, the ACM 2001 Allen Newell Award, the Norbert Wiener Award of the IEEE Systems, Man and Cybernetics Society, Civitate Honoris Causa by Budapest Tech (BT) Polytechnical Institution, Budapest, Hungary, the V. Kaufmann Prize, International Association for Fuzzy-Set Management and Economy (SIGEF), the Nicolaus Copernicus Medal of the Polish Academy of Sciences, the J. Keith Brimacombe IPMM Award, the Silicon Valley Engineering Hall of Fame, the Heinz Nixdorf MuseumsForum Wall of Fame, the Egleston Medal, the Franklin Institute Medal, the Medal of the Foundation by the Trust of the Foundation for the Advancement of Soft Computing, the High State Award ‘Friendship Order’, from the President of the Republic of Azerbaijan, the Transdisciplinary Award and Medal of the Society for Design and Process Sciences, other awards and twenty-four honorary doctorates. He has published extensively (over 200 single-authored papers) on a wide variety of subjects relating to the conception, design and analysis of information/intelligent systems, and is serving on the editorial boards of over seventy journals.

Prior to the publication of his first paper on fuzzy sets in 1965, Lotfi Zadeh’s work was concerned in the main with systems analysis, decision analysis and information systems. His current research is focused on fuzzy logic, semantics of natural languages, computational theory of perceptions, computing with words, extended fuzzy logic and Z-numbers.


Formal Methods for Highly Automated Driving

Feb 22, 2016, 4-5pm, 250 SDH, Werner Damm, Carl von Ossietzky Universität Oldenburg.

Slides

Abstract

We discuss three complementary approaches jointly contributing for building safety cases for highly automated driving.

(1) Traffic Sequence Charts (TSCs), derived from Live Sequence Charts, offer a formal specification method for requirement capturing and scenario description for highly automated driving. They form the basis for adressing the following industrial needs 1. A formally defined compositional approach to generate all possible traffic environment situations from a parameterized set of atomic scenarios 2. A requirement analysis method for cooperative highly automated driving supported with methods for simulation based methods for completeness analysis and methods for proving consistency of requirements. 3. Specify conditions on the health state of the vehicle or the environmental conditions around the vehicle under which the specified service for highly automated driving is available 4. Supported by methods for virtual model-in-the loop testing, hardware-in-the loop testing, and vehicle testing of highly automated driving functions 5. Supported by methods for automatic generation of monitors for on-line supervision of assumptions and services for highly automated driving (2) Remorse free Strategies and optimality of world models We introduce the concept of remorse-free dominant strategies which allow to compare strategies for applications where winning strategies dont exist (such as for highly autonomous driving), using the intuitive concept of remorse. We call strategies “remorse-free dominant” if no other strategy could have done better in comparable environment situations, even if we add more observations about real-world artefacts to the world model. We can effectively test whether a model allows for remorse free dominant strategies after using methods such as predicate abstraction to reduce models to finite state models – thus such world models are optimal –adding more observations does not improve the strategic capabilities. We can effectively synthese remorse-free dominant strategies in optimal world models. We can effectively compute assumptions on the environment under which such strategies are in fact winning strategies.

(3) We present a virtual testbed for Human-in-the-Loop analysis of advanced driver assistance system, which allows for co-simulation and statistical model-checking of executable driver models based on empirically validated cogntive driver models, models of ADAS, models of vehicle dynamics and models of the traffic environment, developed jointly with the DLR Institute of Transportation, supporting TSCs

Bio:

Werner Damm holds a Diploma in Computer Science and Mathematics from the University of Bonn (1976), and a PhD in Computer Science from the RWTH Aachen (1981, Best Dissertation Award) in formal semantics. In 1986 he received the Venia Legendi from the RWTH Aachen for his research in Computer Architecture. Since 1987 he is a full professor at the Carl von Ossietzky Universität Oldenburg, holding first the Chair for Computer Architecture, and since 2002, the Chair for Safety Critical Embedded Systems. He was a visiting professor at the Weizmann Institute of Sciences (1997, cooperating with A. Pnueli and D. Harel) and Uppsala University (2001, cooperating with B.Jonsson). He is the Scientific Director of the Transregional Collaborative Research Center AVACS (SFB/TR 14 Automatic Verification and Analysis of Complex Systems, www.avacs.org), and the Director of the Interdisciplinary Research Center on Critical Systems Engineering for Socio-Technical Systems (www.uni-oldenburg.de/en/cse/) . He is a member of acatech, the German National Academy of Science and Engineering.

He is a member of the Editorial Board of the Journal of Formal Methods in System Design, a member of the Steering Board of the Cyber‐Physical Systems Week, and the Chairman of the Steering Board of the conference series on Hybrid Systems HSCC.

He is driving applied research in his roles as a member of the Board of Directors of the applied research institute OFFIS (www.offis.de), a not-for-profit association providing IT solutions for energy, health, and transportation, where he is responsible for its cross-sectorial research strategy and chairing the OFFIS R&D Division on Transportation.

He is the Chairman of the SafeTRANS association (www.safetrans-de.org), a not-for profit association with institutional membership, integrating leading companies and research institutes in the transportation domain in joint strategic projects on enhancing safety in transportation through IT-based solutions. He has been chairing the committee for the German National Roadmap for Embedded Systems and contributed in other roadmapping activities such as the acatech agenda CPS, the roadmap for industry 4.0 coordinated by the Forschungsunion, the roadmap Automotive Embedded Systems 2030 published jointly by SafeTRANS and VDA, and is currently chairing a roadmap process for Safety, Testing and Development Processes for Highly Automated Systems.

He is a co-founder and Chairman of the steering board of the European Institute for Complex Safety Critical Systems Engineering (www.eicose.eu), integrating large enterprises, SMEs and research organizations developing critical systems for aerospace, automotive, automation, rail and health applications. EICOSE has been driving the R&D strategy of the Joint Undertaking Artemis (www.artemis.org) in the areas of safety critical systems, human centered design, and hardware architectures through roadmapping and incubation of large projects implementing its roadmap. EICOSE has created a European wide innovation eco-system around the Artemis Tool Platform for Critical Systems Engineering, and has been recognized as a center of innovation excellence by the Artemis Industrial Association representing the private sector in the Joint Undertaking Artemis.

Werner Damm is a co‐founder and member of the Board of BTC Embedded Systems AG (www.btc‐es.org), the supplier for IBM Rational´s Testing Solutions, and the provider of ISO 26262 compliant testing solutions for embedded automotive applications.


Embracing Complexity: A Fractal Calculus Approach to the Modeling and Optimization of Cyber-Physical Systems

Feb 29, 2016, 4-5pm, 250 SDH, Paul Bogdan, University of Southern California.

Slides

Abstract

Cyber-physical systems (CPS) constitute a new generation of networked embedded systems that interweave computation, communication and control to facilitate our interaction with the physical world. They will stand among other application domains at the foundation of novel smart healthcare systems, which monitor individual physiological process across time and enable accurate disease prediction and health assessment. However, existing approaches to their modeling and optimization ignore important mathematical characteristics (e.g., non-stationarity, fractality). To face these challenges, we embrace the complexity of biological systems: instead of skirting around their non-linear variability. We propose a statistical physics inspired approach to CPS by encapsulating the observed mathematical characteristics of cyber and physical processes via a dynamical master equation. The first part of the talk is dedicated to explaining the benefits of this new approach, which facilitates a more accurate state-space modeling of Networks-on-Chip workloads, contributes to power savings and opens new possibilities for the dynamic optimization of large-scale systems. The second part focuses on a concrete example of a mathematical model based on fractional calculus concepts, which takes into account the dynamics of blood glucose characteristics (e.g., time dependent fractal behavior) and can be used to design an artificial pancreas that regulates insulin injection. Finally, the benefits of this mathematical framework will be also demonstrated in the context of interdependent networks by elucidating the brain-muscle interdependency with applications to brain-machine-body-interfaces and the brain functional connectivity.

Bio:

Paul Bogdan is an Assistant Professor in the Ming Hsieh Department of Electrical Engineering at University of Southern California. He received his Ph.D. degree in Electrical and Computer Engineering from Carnegie Mellon University. His work has been recognized with a number of distinctions, including the 2015 NSF CAREER Award, the 2012 A.G. Jordan Award from the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, Carnegie Mellon University for outstanding Ph.D. thesis and service, the 2012 Best Paper Award from the Networks-on-Chip Symposium (NOCS), the 2012 D.O. Pederson Best Paper Award from IEEE Transactions on Computer-Aided Design of Integrated Circuits and Systems, the 2012 Best Paper Award from the International Conference on Hardware/Software Codesign and System Synthesis (CODES+ISSS), the 2013 Best Paper Award from the 18th Asia and South Pacific Design Automation Conference, and the 2009 Roberto Rocca Ph.D. Fellowship. His research interests include the theoretical foundations of cyber-physical systems, modeling and analysis of biological systems and swarms, understanding of neural and cognitive systems via new mathematical models, development of new control algorithms for dynamical systems exhibiting multi-fractal characteristics, modeling biological / molecular communication, development of fractal mean field games to model and analyze biological, social and technological system-of-systems, performance analysis and design methodologies for many core systems.


Mar 08, 2016, 4-5pm, 250 SDH, Oussama Khatib, Stanford University.

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Mar 14, 2016, 4-5pm, 250 SDH, Jonathan Sprinkle, University of Arizona.

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Mar 28, 2016, 4-5pm, 250 SDH, Stefano Carpin, University of California, Merced.

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Apr 04, 2016, 4-5pm, 250 SDH, Gregory Hager, Johns Hopkins University.

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Apr 11, 2016, 4-5pm, 250 SDH, Parimal Kopardekar, NASA.

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Apr 18, 2016, 4-5pm, 250 SDH, Yiannis Aloimonos, University of Maryland, College Park.

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Apr 25, 2016, 4-5pm, 250 SDH, Mireille Broucke, University of Toronto.

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May 02, 2016, 4-5pm, 250 SDH, Radha Poovendran, University of Washington.

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May 09, 2016, 4-5pm, 250 SDH, Ian Mitchell, University of British Columbia.

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May 16, 2016, 4-5pm, 250 SDH, Joao Hespanha, University of California, Santa Barbara.

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